Tutus and Tattoos

It’s crazy that I haven’t posted in a year, but it has also been a crazy year — so it all works out.

I’ve been busy combining my Personal Me, Doctor Me and Artist Me to design a full immersion 3-month program for helping girls-of-all-ages untangle from depression (or as I like to call it, The D-Word). Probably the most rewarding and exhausting thing I’ve done in my whole life. In case you didn’t know — depression isn’t a mental illness of the questionably sane. It just might be the sanest response ever.
Tutus and Tattoos
What else is new?
Come dance with me in my mini art class Tutus and Tattoos. Just $15USD.

Also, lots of new stuff in the shoppe. And more stuff going up today.

Come connect with me on Facebook and Instagram.

heroine happiness : beyond the disney princess

Disney gets a lot of flack for its ‘princessification‘ of its heroines. Where Disney heros save the day with their bulging biceps and gallant swords, the heroines are often turned in to passive and pretty victims with tiny feet and angelic voices whose only mission is to sit back and be saved by the handsome prince.

But even with the glitter and woodland animals — in order for Disney heroines to reach their happy ever afters they all had to face uncomfortable challenges and find their strength to step in to who they really are.

Traditionally, fairytale heroines are powerful and passionate girls who confront the often mad world head-on to make things right. The heroine’s journey is about leaving the comfort of the status quo (which, in reality, is usually quite uncomfortable) to uncover the magical part of herself that lives beyond the everyday world. It requires braveness and kickassery. Not dwarves and princes.

absinthealice

 

And fairytales themselves are really templates for personal growth and development.  About discovering who you are, what you really stand for and what you really want. About learning to rise to difficulty, hurt and pain as well as love, laughter and fun. About using fear in a constructive way. About uncovering your magic and talents to fill that hole in the world that only heroine-shaped you can fill.

A heroine is:

  • Fiercely independent. She takes 100% responsibility for her situation…doesn’t wait for permission…or for anyone else to catch up. And her successes or failures ain’t no one else’s business.
  • An action figure – She makes shit happen and isn’t just a legend or victim in her own mind.
  • Capitalizes on her strengths
  • Embraces and re-purposes her “flaws
  • Brave – FYI brave does not mean fearless. Everybody is scared.
  • Instinctual – Connected to her inner wisdom and GPS…making the self-help literature library superfluous.
  • Passionate purpose – She has a driving mission that makes slaying the dragons and escaping the sucking swamps not only doable, but a little bit fun.
  • Playful – She’s a funny chick that keeps it real but doesn’t take herself too seriously.
  • Bad. Ass.

And, of course, adventurous….though not necessarily innately so. But when it becomes glaringly obvious that things need to change — she’s down.

Tell me who your favorite fairytale heroine is and why! 

 

 

adventures in lalaland: a graphic novella

Moving can suck. But it can also be highly entertaining as you sort through forgotten belongings, memories, letters from high school BF’s, so-bad-they-are-awesome 80’s pictures…and of course that graphic novel project from graphic design school.

What’s even more entertaining is that this is before California was in the picture, before Lalatopia, before I found my artist wings (obv), and before tutu’s had become a wardrobe essential…just goes to show that some seeds are planted deep…and if you can imagine it…you can create it! (For those new to the blog I’m actually moving to the Lalaland in 10 days.)

I believe this was an assignment for a creative thinking class circa 2009 — we had to create a concept and rough mock-up for a graphic novel (rough being the operative word here!).   So, without further ado — the debut of my first, and likely last, web novella: Adventures in LalaLand — The case of the missing chocolate chips.

Although the story is at or around the reading comprehension level of an untrained monkey — here’s a little background to give you a running start:

 

PicMonkey Collage

 

When we first meet our heroine, her favorite breakfast is about to be interrupted by a very rude discovery (Click the first pic to open the slideshow)…

 

LE FIN